Two ways to view world culture through time and space are by reveling in its diversity, or by acknowledging its commonality. This project’s focus is based on the latter.

Joseph Campbell would argue that over millennia, mythological concepts have evolved and continue to evolve as regards the human condition. The worldwide trans cultural consistency of these myths place them in the realm of what Carl Jung has termed “the collective unconscious.” This “collective” has produced consistent themes, down through history and prehistory. These themes take symbolic form, and from these forms art and artifact emerge. Yggdrasil, The Bodhi Tree, The Tree of Knowledge, as well as the Christian Cross are all examples of the Sacred Tree, also identified as the “axis mundi.” Such symbolic consistency is but a very small example of the “collective unconsciousness,” exerting its inexorable influence. It is our hope that the museum will emphasize the many manifestations for our human singularity.

This proposal reinforces mythic and symbolic imagery, in addition to architectural precedents. The sacred Mountain for example, can be implied by the truncated pyramidal form, while the stairs leading up to the entry court reinforce the idea of “holy precincts” placed on high as with the traditional Greek Acropolis. On the other hand, the generating form of the split “vescia pisces” has its own iconography, which may or not be “read”, and understood. And while these abstractions and references may serve as a clue towards intent, the architecture must ultimately succeed on a visceral, unconscious and emotional level.

commercial architecture projects by vBaras Architects of Port Jervis, NY

Goteborg Museum of Culture

goteburg museum entry gallery floor plan blueprints, designed by vBaras Architectsgoteburg museum drawings, designed by vBaras Architectsgoteburg museum blueprints, designed by vBaras Architectsgoteburg museum elevation blueprints, designed by vBaras Architectsgoteburg museum blueprints, designed by vBaras Architectsgoteburg museum elevation blueprints, designed by vBaras Architects